Join Epstein Becker Green attorneys, Brian G. Cesaratto and Brian E. Spang, for a discussion of how employers can best protect their critical technologies and trade secrets from employee and other insider threats. Topics to be discussed include:

  • Determining your biggest threat by using available data
  • What keeps you up at night?
  • Foreseeing the escalation in risk, from insider and cyber threats to critical technologies
  • New protections and remedies under the Trade Secret Protection Act of 2014
  • Where are your trade secrets located, and what existing protections are in place?
  • What types of administrative and technical controls should your firm consider implementing for the key material on your network to protect against an insider threat?
  • What legal requirements may apply under applicable data protection laws?
  • How do you best protect trade secrets and other critical technologies as information increasingly moves into the cloud?
  • Using workforce management and personnel techniques to gain protection
  • The importance of an incident response plan
  • Developing and implementing an effective litigation response strategy to employee theft

Wednesday, October 3, 2018.
12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. ET
Register for this complimentary webinar today!

It is highly likely that the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (“NAIC”) will adopt a model data cyber security law premised largely on the New York State Department of Financial Services (“NYSDFS”) cyber security regulations.  Recently, we discussed the NYSDFS’ proposed extension of its cyber security regulations to credit reporting agencies in the wake of the Equifax breach.  New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced, “The Equifax breach was a wakeup call and with this action New York is raising the bar for consumer protections that we hope will be replicated across the nation.”  Upon adoption by the NAIC, the NYSDFS regulations requiring that NYS financial organizations have in place a written and implemented cyber security program will gain further traction toward setting a nationwide standard for cyber security and breach notification.  Indeed, although there are differences, the NAIC drafters emphasized that any Licensee in compliance with the NYSDFS “Cybersecurity Requirements for Financial Services Companies” will also be in compliance with the model law.

The NAIC Working Committee expressed a preference for a uniform nationwide standard: “This new model, the Insurance Data Security Model Law, will establish standards for data security and investigation and notification of a breach of data security that will apply to insurance companies, producers and other persons licensed or required to be licensed under state law. This model, specific to the insurance industry, is intended to supersede state and federal laws of general applicability that address data security and data breach notification. Regulated entities need clarity on what they are expected to do to protect sensitive data and what is expected if there is a data breach.  This can be accomplished by establishing a national standard and uniform application across the nation.”  Other than small licensees, the only exemption is for Licensees certifying that they have in place an information security program that meets the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.  According to the Committee, following adoption, it is likely that state legislatures throughout the nation will move to adopt the model law.

The model law is intended to protect against both data loss negatively impacting individual insureds, policy holders and other consumers, as well as loss that would cause a material adverse impact to the business, operations or security of the Licensee (e.g., trade secrets).  Each Licensee is required to develop, implement and maintain a comprehensive written information security program based on a risk assessment and containing administrative, technical and physical safeguards for the protection of non-public information and the Licensee’s information system.  The formalized risk assessment must identify both internal threats from employees and other trusted insiders, as well as external hacking threats.  Significantly, the model law recognizes the increasing trend toward cloud based services by requiring that the program address the security of non-public information held by the Licensee’s third-party service providers.  The model law permits a scalable approach that may include best practices of access controls, encryption, multi-factor authentication, monitoring, penetration testing, employee training and audit trails.

In the event of unauthorized access to, disruption or misuse of the Licensee’s electronic information system or non-public information stored on such system, notice must be provided to the Licensee’s home State within 72 hours.  Other impacted States must be notified where the non-public information involves at least 250 consumers and there is a reasonable likelihood of material harm.  The notice must specifically and transparently describe, among other items, the event date, the description of the information breached, how the event was discovered, the period during which the information system was compromised, and remediation efforts.  Applicable data breach notification laws requiring notice to the affected individuals must also be complied with.